Sabelmouse
Leaving aside the woeful absence of any concern for those who are not best-selling authors and who therefore might not be able to afford to buy books, particularly in the current economic climate, Deary’s argument is pathetic. First, he is quoted as saying “People have to make the choice to buy books”. If there were no public libraries, as Deary proposes, people would have no choice at all - they would indeed “have to” buy books if they wished to read. A coerced choice is no choice whatsoever.
Second, in attacking the concept of public libraries, he attempts to use the analogy of “car libraries” and “food libraries” giving away free Porsches and food. The whole point of a public lending library is that the books are borrowed, not given away, as Deary seems to suggest. The borrower does not get to keep the book but must return it so that other readers get the chance to borrow it. In addition, as grumbling Deary acknowledges, authors receive a payment from local authorities both when their book is bought by the library and also every time a book is borrowed. Local authorities get the money to pay for this through local taxes paid for by the book-loving citizens in their area. So the whole idea that books are being given away free is rubbish.
In the broader context of continual attacks on basic education and health services, its pretty depressing that someone who has done so well from selling books should be attacking public libraries, one of the last non-profit making forums for the less well-off to access not only entertainment, as Deary suggests, but also education. His comments read like something one of the crazier Tea-Party members, or Alan B’Stard might come out with.
4 notes

Five reasons why I love my library

Site member TheBookThief shares the top five reasons why she loves her library - and why you should get down to yours


Do you love your library? Tell us why! You could write a list or a poem, like Julia Donaldson, draw a picture, write a story or take a photo. Send your contribution to childrens.books@guardian.co.uk and we’ll add them to our Love your library page, celebrating libraries all over the world

There are loads of reasons why I love my library, but a few of the main reasons are listed below.

1. The books
So, you’re probably thinking - well, duh! That’s the point of a library - to lend out books. But it’s the selection of books that are there. I hang out in the YA section mostly, and I am so impressed by the different variety and all the genres that are available. Oh, and also by the fact that there are books in large print for those with dyslexia or a disability which impairs their reading and audio books. There literally is a book for everyone.

2. The atmosphere
Some of my favorite books are those which make me feel like I’m living the story with the characters. And Matilda and Harry Potter, to name a few, are some characters who are seen throughout their stories in libraries. I like the feeling of being able to relate to them, and to experience what they experienced. Admittedly, I’ve never visited my library wearing an invisibility cloak, but I’m sure I’d love it just as much if I did. The bright lighting and the comfy sofas are irresistible…you just want to grab a thick paperback, curl up and start reading.

3. The fact that it’s there
Hardly any kids I know visit the library regularly - even I don’t find time to go that often. It’s actually considered embarrassing to be seen there by some groups, and I think some people are barely aware of their existence. I can’t allow this to happen - I can’t allow a culture like this continue. Why is it so embarrassing to like reading? I don’t understand. I’m 13, I haven’t started my GCSEs yet and so the reason kids my age aren’t going to the library can’t be because they are constantly studying (by the way, my library is a great place to study) or don’t have the time. It’s because they can just buy the book on their kindle. Or (it hurts to say this) because that precious weekend time can be used to make the weekly trip to Hollister or Jack Wills. I’m sorry, but that’s just sickening. I am just so grateful that I have a library to go to, that it hasn’t become extinct.

4. FREE BOOKS!!!!
I’m not forking out pocket money for the new hardcover Percy Jackson or a new audiobook - it’s all free! The only place where there isn’t a catch, a little terms and conditions that says I pay a monthly fee, or a “mandatory donation” every time I visit. I can just hand my library card over (well, actually scan it, thanks to the new technology) and I’ve got a bagful of treats, ready to be devoured.

5. The people
I live in a university city, and so there are always lots of students, studying their notes, or revising for exams and biting their nails. I’ve seen such fascinating characters, and some crazy fashion…! The librarians are always so lovely and helpful, plus you sometimes meet old classmates or teachers (which can be slightly awkward!) who you can catch up with. Then there are the adorable toddlers, who waddle everywhere, clawing at pages with pudgy hands, and giving you toothy smiles. Just seeing a couple of those grinning little babies is worth the trip to the library…they have the most sincere smiles in the world. The only age in which you truly love everyone.

I really hope this encourages you to visit your library, and maybe donate. Quickly, before libraries become like dinosaurs. Extinct.

Do you love your library? Tell us why! You could write a list or a poem, like Julia Donaldson, draw a picture, write a story or take a photo. Send your contribution to childrens.books@guardian.co.uk and we’ll add them to our Love your library page, celebrating libraries all over the world

2 notes

Talking Volumes: Barbara Kingsolver on being a writer (by MPRdotOrg)

quirkbooks:

btrang:

This is awesome!

And quite true! 

quirkbooks:

btrang:

This is awesome!

And quite true! 

(Source: thehopekiller)

161 notes
olorispublishing:

The Pre-Raphaelite murals in the old Library at the Oxford Union were painted between 1857 and 1859 by a team of young artists including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones. The paintings depict scenes from the Arthurian legends.

olorispublishing:

The Pre-Raphaelite murals in the old Library at the Oxford Union were painted between 1857 and 1859 by a team of young artists including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones. The paintings depict scenes from the Arthurian legends.

29 notes
quirkbooks:

literarydiatribe:


The Shakespeare and Co. Bookshop
Paris, France.

Wow!

quirkbooks:

literarydiatribe:

The Shakespeare and Co. Bookshop

Paris, France.

Wow!

35 notes