Sabelmouse
In the heyday of 1970s vegetarianism, quiche was the go-to dish. Everybody was making them. When I taught vegetarian cooking classes then, quiche (not the classic quiche lorraine with lardons, of course) would be one of the first recipes I’d teach. I made them by the sheet pan for catering jobs; they were extremely popular, even though I now know that the crusts I made in those days weren’t very good, and the formula I used for the custard wasn’t nearly as satisfying as the formula I use now.


http://zesterdaily.com/cooking/falling-love-quiche/?utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=12370418&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-83EoUEF_CNcBXe1im-y5ECdpaoH23QDrGl9_wOuxCctPxVfJVd6Bzv95rVC1u8evisezn-Szeoqzw6RGBl2ucbO5P6Sw&_hsmi=12370418

In the heyday of 1970s vegetarianism, quiche was the go-to dish. Everybody was making them. When I taught vegetarian cooking classes then, quiche (not the classic quiche lorraine with lardons, of course) would be one of the first recipes I’d teach. I made them by the sheet pan for catering jobs; they were extremely popular, even though I now know that the crusts I made in those days weren’t very good, and the formula I used for the custard wasn’t nearly as satisfying as the formula I use now.


http://zesterdaily.com/cooking/falling-love-quiche/?utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=12370418&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-83EoUEF_CNcBXe1im-y5ECdpaoH23QDrGl9_wOuxCctPxVfJVd6Bzv95rVC1u8evisezn-Szeoqzw6RGBl2ucbO5P6Sw&_hsmi=12370418

1 note
Parisians then subsisted on a diet of takeaways. To compose a meal, you or a servant visited a series of traiteurs. One roasted meat, another (a saucier) made sauces, a third prepared soups, for example. In addition there were bakers, pastry cooks, wine merchants (the original “gourmets”) and brewers, all members of competing guilds. Normally, you reheated the food in front of the fire. As in the cookshops that flourished in London at the same time, it was occasionally possible to consume food on the premises. Otherwise, you could only eat out at an inn offering a no-choice table d’hôte, where food was placed in the middle of the table and the faster you ate, the better you fared. An 18th-century authority, Père de la Mésangère, described how Boulanger subverted Parisian food habits, saying he “supplemented his really excellent soups with equally excellent meals… he had fat poultry, new-laid eggs, etc”. There is the detail, too, that he served everything on small marble tables without cloths.

We Don’t Know What Constitutes a True Paleo Diet Read more,However, we absolutely do know what early humans did not eat

As to the second claim, of course there is no one true ancestral diet with a strictly curated, specific list of dietary DOs and DON’Ts. Humans have managed to populate every barely hospitable nook and cranny of this planet. If living things grow, slither, crawl, flap, swim, or otherwise reside there, we will set up shop in order to eat them.

However, patterns do emerge. First, there’s the aforementioned total absences – seed oils, sugar – plus a dearth of cultivated grains. Wild versions of grains existed (after all, the first agriculturalists needed something to domesticate), but there’s little evidence to suggest they were major parts of most early human diets.

Sharp practices: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s mustard recipes
Grainy or smooth, slightly sweet or slightly bitter, fiercely hot or hardly hot at all: there’s a mustard to pep up just about any dish

Sharp practices: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s mustard recipes
Grainy or smooth, slightly sweet or slightly bitter, fiercely hot or hardly hot at all: there’s a mustard to pep up just about any dish